The French painter Gustave Caillebotte owned the painting for about 20 years. [4], Over its history, the building has experienced a wide range of uses: open-air cafe, music-hall, television studios and restaurant. [4], The mill was turned into a guinguette by the surviving son of the miller killed during the siege of Paris in 1814. The windmill Moulin de la Galette, also known as Blute-fin, was built in 1622. Le Moulin de la Galette, 1900 by Pablo Picasso Courtesy of www.PabloPicasso.org: Picasso first visited Paris in 1900 and set up a studio in Montmartre. In the late 19th century, working class Parisians would dress up and spend time there dancing, drinking, and eating galettes into the evening. From 1896 to 1929 the painting hung in the Musée du Luxembourg. Visit the Frank Lloyd Wright–designed Guggenheim Museum in NYC, part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Since the 17th century the windmill has been known for more than just its milling capabilities. This page was last changed on 19 February 2020, at 00:34. It was one of the most expensive artworks ever sold. The Debray family acquired the two mills in 1809 for producing flour, the Blute-fin and the Radet, built in 1717. When he died it became the property of the French Republic. Bal du moulin de la Galette (English: Dance at Le moulin de la Galette) (1876) is a painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir. The painting depicts a typical Sunday afternoon at Moulin de la Galette in the district of Montmartre. The Moulin de la Galette is a windmill and associated businesses situated near the top of the district of Montmartre in Paris. His flair for dancing and enthusiasm attracted patrons to the dancing hall and it became a success. In the late 19th century, working class Parisians would dress up and spend time there dancing, drinking, and eating galettes into the evening. Bal du moulin de la Galette (English: Dance at Le moulin de la Galette) (1876) is a painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir. During the siege, Pierre-Charles Debray was killed and nailed to the wings of the windmill. [11], Vincent van Gogh, Le Moulin de la Galette 1886, Le Moulin de Blute-Fin (1886) from the Le Moulin de la Galette and Montmartre series', Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Au bal du moulin de la Galette 1889, Media related to Moulin de la Galette at Wikimedia Commons, Coordinates: 48°53′14.63″N 2°20′13.36″E / 48.8873972°N 2.3370444°E / 48.8873972; 2.3370444, This article is about the windmill and cabaret. It is now a private property. The Moulin de la Galette was an open-air dancehall and … It is housed at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris and is one of Impressionism's most celebrated masterpieces. [6], The current name Moulin de la Galette is based upon galette, a small brown bread that the Debray millers, who owned the mill in the 19th century, made and sold with a glass of milk. The windmill Radet, however, marks the entrance to a bistro named Le Moulin de la Galette. La Galerie d'Art « Espace Arsinoé » est implantée dans la rue qui monte vers le Moulin de la Galette, en face du « Studio 28 » qui est une salle de cinéma indépendante se consacrant uniquement à la recherche et à la découverte d'oeuvres d'art cinématographiques. It is in the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. [5], The area has been depicted by artists such as Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso,[2] Ramon Casas,[8] Paul François Quinsac,[9] Kees van Dongen[10] and Maurice Utrillo. See the renowned permanent collection and special exhibitions. Pierre-Auguste Renoir. From 1929 it hung in the Musée du Louvre. But it was also used to pressurize the harvest or grind materials needed for manufacturing. [5] A mass grave for those killed during the siege was made just steps away from the Moulin de la Galette. For many years it was owned by John Hay Whitney. The Moulin de la Galette is a windmill and associated businesses situated near the top of the district of Montmartre in Paris. Bal du moulin de la Galette is a typical Impressionist snapshot of real life. The painting depicts a typical Sunday afternoon at the original Moulin de la Galette in the district of Montmartre in Paris. By this time Montmartre had developed a reputation as the bohemian centre of the city and was a mecca for artists. Since the 17th century the windmill has been known for more than just its milling capabilities. It was sent to the Musée d'Orsay in 1986. From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, Top Ten Most Expensive Paintings Sold At Auction, https://simple.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bal_du_moulin_de_la_Galette&oldid=6827089, Articles containing explicitly cited English-language text, Articles with French-language sources (fr), Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License. It shows a richness of form, a fluidity of brush stroke, and a flickering light. The windmill has been classified as a monument since 1958. [1][2] The name Blute-fin comes from the French verb bluter which means sifting flour for the separation from bran. Dance at le Moulin de la Galette. Montmartre, attainable by a train ride or a one-hour walk, was still a village with orchards, shops and two remaining windmills. Dance at le Moulin de la Galette is also known as Bal du moulin de la Galette and it is hailed as one of Renoir's most important works of the mid 1870s. [4] In 1830, they replaced milk with wine (especially the local Montmartre wine) and the windmill became a cabaret. It was restored in 1978, but is not running. Renoir created Bal du moulin de la Galette, an oil painting measuring 52″ by 69″, in 1876.At this time, Impressionism was still in its early stages; Renoir, Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, and Camille Pissarro had held the inaugural Impressionist exhibition just two years prior.By this point, however, the artists associated with the movement had developed unique yet unified approaches to painting. [7], Author Émile Zola wrote in 1876, "We rushed off into the countryside to celebrate the joy of not having to listen to any more talk about politics," which often meant reflection of France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War. On May 17, 1990, his widow sold it for US$78 million at Sotheby's in New York City. One of the windmills was turned into a viewing tower and a dance hall was opened adjacently. In 1924, its owner moved the windmill to the corner of Girardon and Lepic streets. It is in the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. [3], At the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1814, during the siege of Paris three Debray men lost their lives defending the windmill against Cossacks; the miller was killed and nailed to the wings of the windmill. An association Friends of Old Montmartre saved it from destruction in 1915. People came to the relaxed, popular Moulin de la Galette for entertainment and dancing. The tasty bread became so popular that it later became the name of the windmill. In the 19th century, Le Moulin de la Galette represented diversion for Parisian… In 1833, one of the Debrays decided to open an area for dancing, dedicated to the Greek muse Terpsichore. In the late 19th century, working class Parisians would dress up and spend time there dancing, drinking, and eating galettes into the evening. Renoir painted a smaller version of the picture with the same title. [5] Parisians made their way to Montmartre to enjoy "the simple pleasures" of the countryside with a glass of wine, freshly baked bread and a terrace view of Paris and the Seine below. Nineteenth-century owners and millers, the Debray family, made a brown bread, galette, which became popular and thus the name of the windmill and its businesses, which have included a famous guinguetteand restaurant. The painting depicts a typical Sunday afternoon at Moulin de la Galette in the district of Montmartre. Nineteenth-century owners and millers, the Debray family, made a brown bread, galette, which became popular and thus the name of the windmill and its businesses, which have included a famous guinguette and restaurant. This painting is in a private collection. Bal du moulin de la Galette (commonly known as Dance at Le moulin de la Galette) is an 1876 painting by French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir. In the 19th century, Le Moulin de la Galette represented diversion for Parisians seeking entertainment, a glass of wine and bread made from flour ground by the windmill.

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